40 Comments

  1. Joe
    October 8, 2014 @ 10:14 am

    What is wrong with people why would you remove this?

    Reply

    • Chad's Crooked House
      October 8, 2014 @ 10:21 am

      I agree. I put an offer in a house just for a wardrobe like that. OK, not just for that. It would have been so much better than a boring closet that holds clothes properly.

      Reply

  2. Chad's Crooked House
    October 8, 2014 @ 10:17 am

    FYI, to make this even more complicated, I bought antique doors for my house, and the paint just melted off them with SoyGel. It only worked well on the ones that had previously been stained and had varnish under the paint. But on those, it worked so well that my plan to have doors and woodwork that sorta matched went out the window and instead I’ll have doors in whatever beat-up/fancy hybrid condition I’m able to get them into and leave ’em at that.

    You might get sucked into doing the same. Photos of said doors here: http://chadscrookedhouse.wordpress.com/2014/03/02/strip-act/

    Reply

  3. Dianne
    October 8, 2014 @ 10:20 am

    Poor sweet Paul. 🙂

    Reply

  4. Bridget from Refined Vintage
    October 8, 2014 @ 10:30 am

    This was obviously not the one, everything happens the way it’s mean to be. The right one will come along and it will be fabulous and fancy in every way imaginable and make your kitchen the favorite room in your house, I just know it. I love your sense of humor, it helps to have one when doing a whole house remodel.

    Reply

  5. Sarah
    October 8, 2014 @ 10:32 am

    ahhhhhhhh…I, like you, say leave the nails be and don’t step in the damn trash pile! lol My grandfather, who has been an AMAZING help, is the Paul. All nails are evil and must be quarantined from the construction area immediately. So much time removing nails that I could be destroying things…painting things…etc. I may have stepped on two nails while redoing out house, but guess what!!! They weren’t in wood, they were loose, unruly loner nails!

    Reply

  6. melissa
    October 8, 2014 @ 10:34 am

    perhaps you could just remove the doors and the front trim and have those added to custom cabinetry, making it the best of both worlds? To me, you’d have in-great shape boxes to hold stuff, that are squaring making everything easier, but the fancy fronts, and it would be easier to remove.
    But then again, I’m in California where the oldest finds on Craigslist are 80’s brass lamps, so I have no idea what I’m talking about.

    Reply

    • Sarah
      November 5, 2014 @ 11:09 am

      Great suggestion!

      Reply

  7. Beverly
    October 8, 2014 @ 10:45 am

    I live just south of Salado (approx 10 min away & Temple is 10 min North of Salado) and purchased an old country home that I am remodeling the kitchen currently & love the victorian era therefore everything in my home is pretty much more than 100 years old. In my LARGE kitchen (at least to me) I have put in an 1800’s victorian armoire/wardrobe that I inherited from my father (along with other beautiful antiquities) in the kitchen & this is my pantry as well as a storage for the more modern appliances. I looks like it belongs there among the victorian sewing machine & salvaged fretwork above the kitchen window. Love following you.

    Reply

    • AC
      October 10, 2014 @ 3:28 pm

      I’d love to see a picture of your kitchen Beverly.

      Reply

  8. devon
    October 8, 2014 @ 10:47 am

    ooww, DANG! My heart skipped a beat when i saw the first picture of the piece with the mirror and all that beautiful trim……..piece of junk………..ouch! How disappointing that must’ve been! Will be looking forward to see if you are able to use the better one, it certainly looks impressive to be recycled. Hope you are able to find a way to salvage it and will let us know!

    Reply

  9. Shanan
    October 8, 2014 @ 10:52 am

    Victoria – am I missing something in this post? Did you get any of this cabinetry? And I agree whole heartedly – the nails scare me, too.. I am accident prone and would most definitely get mauled by said nails and require a scary huge tetanus needle.

    Reply

    • Victoria Elizabeth Barnes
      October 8, 2014 @ 10:58 am

      No, I didn’t! I guess this is one of those times when I assume that you all know exactly what is going on in my head…

      Reply

      • Shanan
        October 8, 2014 @ 11:02 am

        My telepathy skills are clearly lacking – and me being a self-proclaimed long long sister of yours, too! Gah! Don’t disown me yet! (creepy or funny? or does it matter? LOL)

        Reply

        • Cheryl
          October 8, 2014 @ 1:08 pm

          I’m glad someone else asked 🙂

          Reply

  10. Garden, Home and Party
    October 8, 2014 @ 11:05 am

    That one built-in cupboard looked promising in the picture, too bad it didn’t work out. The search is usually my favorite part but I can see how this might get a little frustrating. Still, your record proves that persistence pays off.
    🙂
    Karen

    Reply

  11. judy
    October 8, 2014 @ 11:40 am

    I must admit I would have bought it anyway. It just speaks of another time and place where everything is about Elegance and Beauty. At the very least I could have stuck it in the Garage(if we still had a Garage) and stored deteriorating cans of paint in it to an unusable state. This is Chemistry I have perfected.

    Reply

  12. noele
    October 8, 2014 @ 11:44 am

    hi victoria, i was just looking at your meet the kitchen post and i came up with what i think you will agree is a cheap and easy fix for the addition just make both the ceilings match from the kitchen to the patio wall.leave the french doors just as they are and just fix the bathroom ceiling or remove it all together(the bathroom). it will look a lot mor cohesive and it wont cost a lot. leave the orange paint.lol

    Reply

  13. Pj
    October 8, 2014 @ 12:30 pm

    Ummm . . . guess I have a talent for looking past flaws, because I would’ve probably tried to dismantle both cabinets & haul them home. While I actually prefer this style with paint, I can envision these units stripped & installed on either side of a window seat, similar to what I want built in our office/library. Eastlake cabinetry isn’t appropriate in our historic Italianate home & painted cabinets wouldn’t look right with the office’s dark walnut woodwork. A compromise would be to incorporate these units in our kitchen, where we plan to paint both the cabinets & (plain oak) woodwork.

    Reply

  14. Laurie
    October 8, 2014 @ 12:39 pm

    This is probably a terrible faux pas to ask, but could you take those cabinets as inspiration and recreate their fanciness in your kitchen? It looks like lots of trim tricks could duplicate them. Then you could also do things like make the “cabinet” front actually a deep drawer which is a heck of a lot nicer for those low cabinets than laying on the floor to get things in the back. (unless you keep your floors cleaner than I do)

    The idea of having giant cabinets like that in the kitchen make my heart go pitter patter. Mainly because it is a large space to store STUFF and that is a wonderful thing.

    Reply

  15. Linda
    October 8, 2014 @ 1:12 pm

    You might be able to stack them on top of each other and reconfigure the pilasters.

    Reply

  16. linda
    October 8, 2014 @ 2:02 pm

    Reconfiguring each of the groups. IE: Remove the lower section with drawers by elimination then you may have great height wall cabinets. Possibly remove the upper section on the 1st group and use the lower section as wall cabinets, and then stack the shorter ones for areas like over the range and refrigerator. You can also create your own blind cabinet from a single door opening by building the blind corner with a single cabinet door. There maybe more potential for these pieces that you had originally considered. Just a thought.

    Reply

    • Pj
      October 8, 2014 @ 2:36 pm

      Yes, I’d probably try to use those in the kitchen & repaint them white. I can also imagine a custom hood built of an antique headboard in a similar style—like the one I bought for $30 last year. 😉

      Reply

  17. Kimberly ~ Serendipity Refined
    October 8, 2014 @ 2:32 pm

    Keep checking…the price may come down…and he’ll need to remove the debris when he insulates (now that he and Paul figured that out). I’d offer to store it for you for all of eternity in my garage (next to the farmhouse sink and cast iron tub) if you’d be willing to transport it to Illinois as we don’t have anything even remotely that fancy and I would surely be the envy of my neighborhood for even storing something of such magnificence. xo

    Reply

  18. Robin
    October 8, 2014 @ 2:33 pm

    I am adding on a kitchen to our house. The plan calls for a shallow floor to ceiling pantry. Those would be PERFECT. I am very jealous. I need one wall of pantry cabinets 10′ long, and another about 7′. (And no, I don’t think they have to match!) Those are exactly what I want and I didn’t even know it. Now I have to Pin this post to my Kitchen board on Pinterest. My husband will want to kill me. 🙂

    Reply

  19. Yvonne Angus
    October 8, 2014 @ 3:26 pm

    Personally, I can envision these in a BATHROOM! As they are shallow, they would work perfectly for all the bottles of product we seem to collect!

    Reply

  20. Rebeccah
    October 8, 2014 @ 3:28 pm

    Wait. Are you really over six feet tall? If so, then I have solved the mystery of the big fancy things. I am tall-ish. Love huge horses, large jewelry, oversized chairs etc. It’s a thing.

    Reply

    • Victoria Elizabeth Barnes
      October 9, 2014 @ 10:24 am

      I am 6 feet… Not over. Possibly giant fancy things just seem like normal-sized fancy things? Plus, normal-sized fancy things are always disappointing.

      Reply

      • Rebeccah
        October 9, 2014 @ 10:29 am

        I think you may be onto something. And I absolutely concur about normal sized fancy things…meh.

        Reply

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