121 Comments

  1. karen
    January 24, 2017 @ 1:21 pm

    Well, hell.. you are one step ahead of me. I don’t even pretend I’m gonna rip that sucker apart and but her back together. No.. I am a wuss and walk away from anything that will require my attention in the re-upholstery department because THOSE TACTS! THOSE SPRINGS! They’re evil. Kudos to your husband for doing a stellar job. Good luck with the trim.

    Reply

  2. Cristina-Finding Grace Interiors
    January 24, 2017 @ 1:29 pm

    You are so funny!!! The sofa came out beautiful!!
    I think you and Paul need your own HGTV show, I won’t miss it!!!

    Reply

    • Phyllis
      January 26, 2017 @ 8:50 am

      Yes! HGTV we know you are here looking… can this happen?

      Reply

  3. Laura M
    January 24, 2017 @ 1:36 pm

    double welt — much cleaner looking than the braided trim. I vote for double welting a thousand times ++++

    Reply

  4. Gina
    January 24, 2017 @ 1:37 pm

    I have a “Paul” character in my life, though after 30 years of fixing stuff he is sorta losing patience. How do you kids pull this off without any yelling?

    Reply

  5. Maureen
    January 24, 2017 @ 1:41 pm

    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: DOES PAUL HAVE A TWIN BROTHER???? Because obviously I need a Paul twin. I’m in the middle of ripping apart my dining room and have furniture to refinish and crazy to share…

    Reply

  6. jeanette mattioni
    January 24, 2017 @ 2:04 pm

    Love the sofa, your husband is a saint! Especially when there is a FABULOUS (inexpensive!) upholstery guy right around the corner from you in Norristown! I don’t upholster any more because HE does! Also, you can just fold you a stip of your fabric in three’s (lengthwise) to the width you would like your trim to be, and VIO`LA! Self-trim! Upholstery guy didn’t get it until I showed him, but it is now my standard go-to trim! Good luck on your new sofa!

    Reply

    • Jayne Zabala
      January 24, 2017 @ 4:40 pm

      Cutting your trim fabric on the diagonal makes it much easier to work with, especially if there are any curves involved.

      Reply

  7. Laura Lee
    January 24, 2017 @ 2:10 pm

    Would a brown trim not work? Do you mean like the rope type of trim? I know you can do that yourself on a sewing machine with the fabric you already have though I’ve no idea how.

    Reply

  8. Carolyn
    January 24, 2017 @ 2:16 pm

    I’ve had to make my own trim before, maybe check out the link below. There are a lot of other tutorials out there.

    http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/diy-upholstery-project-how-make-your-own-custom-fabric-piping-or-welting-apartment-therapy-tutorials-202418

    Reply

  9. Cathy Wright
    January 24, 2017 @ 2:34 pm

    A contrasting color would look lovely. And it looks like it is neutral enough that you could choose from a range of palettes…blue, gray, aqua, black. I love your projects (um, or Paul’s), and you always brighten my day with your humor.

    Reply

  10. Sue J.
    January 24, 2017 @ 2:42 pm

    Dye trim to match?

    Reply

  11. Annika
    January 24, 2017 @ 2:45 pm

    Where do I find a Paul??

    Reply

  12. Vickie H.
    January 24, 2017 @ 2:47 pm

    Tina at The Enchanted Home is the queen of great trim! Good luck!

    Reply

  13. Kathy
    January 24, 2017 @ 2:49 pm

    Oh my goodness, what a beautiful piece! Hats off to you for even trying! Your husband must truly love you to rescue you when you throw in the towel. Love this post!

    Reply

  14. Cynthia Kammann
    January 24, 2017 @ 3:43 pm

    I have 2 words for you… contrasting trim.

    Reply

  15. JeanFB
    January 24, 2017 @ 3:44 pm

    Oh no. Oh no oh no oh no. I was going to try this. Seriously I have an Eastlake settee sitting in my foyer and I’ve been like…. “That should be a fairly easy first-time upholstery project.” Ummmm…. I can’t say you haven’t warned me. (Standing on edge of cliff now…..)

    Your new kittay is soooooo prettay!

    Reply

  16. Andrea Sager
    January 24, 2017 @ 3:47 pm

    I didn’t read all the comments to see if someone said this, but the double welting can actually be made for you at an upholstery shop for a fairly nominal fee. (And at this point I would think “nominal” might have reached a realm of significant relativity.)

    Reply

  17. Tracey
    January 24, 2017 @ 4:25 pm

    Oh, the tacks! I always find the best way to make sure you’ve got all the tacks out is to sit on it. Then you will find EVERY. SINGLE. TACK. left in it.

    Reply

  18. Wendy
    January 24, 2017 @ 4:29 pm

    What about matching the trim to the color of the wood?

    Reply

  19. Tammy
    January 24, 2017 @ 4:31 pm

    You cant imagine how relieved that Im not the only person who set out to find the Holy Grail of color that is the perfect bluish greyish (not too this or that) that existed only in my head. I once dragged my husband through the fabric stores in the Grand Bizaar of Istanbul looking for a fabric that existed only in my imagination. Im forever searching for stuff I later learn doesnt exist.

    I finally mixed up paints to create a color swatch then had the paint store analyze and recreate it….in their computer its saved as “Holy Grail”….its now the color of my office with Eastlake Victorian furniture similar to that sofa.

    Reply

  20. Jayne Zabala
    January 24, 2017 @ 4:38 pm

    I completely understand the staples issue. I bought a chair with the intention of having it recovered and thought — I’ll take the fabric off (it was horrid). There were thousands of staples and when I thought I had them all out, then a few more would pop up! I just finished a slip cover for a new chair and ottoman (why would any person in their right mind buy a white linen chair and ottoman with two cats and one dog in the family?! In any event, that was the hardest project I have ever taken on and right then and there decided I wouldn’t even think about tackling re-upholstering the chair! As a suggestion regarding your trim — you could make your own piping (single or double) with the left over fabric and it would match perfectly. Making single piping is super easy and in Dallas, there is a man who makes double piping (in a jiff — he has the right equipment) and it’s really reasonable. Just a thought to get you out of your dilemma and help Paul finish your project!

    Reply

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